Tuesday, 08/26/2014

Lenny & Max


Missed Bernstein's birthday yesterday, so here's a favorite conversation.

ntodd

August 26, 10:44 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

“God does not write catchy tunes.”

Catchy Tunes:

It’s not just this. Every written word is a suicide note.
And a love letter, too.
 
There may be no one to talk to who would get it,
but if you write it down maybe someone will get it after you’ve left the room,
 
or in five hundred years, or maybe someone from Sirius, the Dog Star,
will get it. The composer Karlheinz Stockhausen
 
claimed he was born on Sirius. You remember him:
the genius who said the crashing of planes
 
into the World Trade Center was the greatest concert ever held,
although he later conceded the audience had not been given the option
 
to not attend
and that somewhat diminished its perfection.

Robert Thomas.

ntodd

August 26, 10:06 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Garbage


I nailed my faith to the sticking pole.

ntodd

August 26, 9:34 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Primary Day

Mostly Nanny Todd duty today, but after the kids had gone home and I'd made dinner for my fam, I headed over to the Town Office to do my duty as a member of our town's Board of Civil Authority.  Voted, did voter checkouts for the final hour, then counted the whopping 19 Republican ballots cast whilst other folks counted the 19 Dems and 2 Prog ballots (nobody voted in the Liberty Union primary, which makes me feel like I should have).

I had estimated we might get 50 voters to the polls today, proving I am still way too optimistic.  My favorite GOP ballot of the night had mostly Democrats written in, and included my favorite birther, H Brooke Paige, for Attorney General.  I was doing the tally sheet, so my horrible penmanship was taxed quite heavily for that one.

Democracy is messy, but fun.

ntodd

PS--We also had our town Democratic committee caucus, which is traditionally held in the parking lot.  Needed to nominate JP candidates (the GOP picked 3, so we pick 4 since a Dem is Governor, per tradition).  Sadly, one of ours, who also served as committee secretary and treasurer, was killed in a car accident back in June, so we had to change our slate a bit. 

PPS--As I noted on FB, we vote counters debated whether it was really worth casting our ballots when we'd just have more work to do later.  Even split: 3 of us did, 3 exercised their right not to vote.

August 26, 8:35 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

#Godwin'sSlatePitches

Oh, for fuck's sakeThe Real #GenocideinGaza - It’s the one Hamas hopes to perpetrate on the Jews.

Don't forget St Anselm's Law: something unreal cannot be greater than something real.  Or something.

ntodd

August 26, 10:17 AM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, 08/25/2014

Who's gonna pay attention to your dreams?


Who's gonna drive you home tonight?

ntodd

August 25, 10:27 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Golly, What Would James Madison Say About Michael Brown?

Teens generally are angels, never going through any negative shit.  Just like men and governments.  If you aren't an angel, you deserve to die without due process.  So it is written.

ntodd

August 25, 9:13 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Dover, I Hardly...


Mary Hogan Elementary, on the way to Mommy's gig.


Still in Middlebury.


Squidward behind the elementary school in Newfane.


Alaska chases Mexico.


Another day keeping the kids alive deserves a nice glass of Malbec, amirite?

ntodd

August 25, 7:30 PM in Family Life | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Why Not Wrap It In Bacon?

Oh, Lord:

Sneakers Bistro, a Winooski breakfast hot-spot, is one of several  businesses that has voluntarily maintained a small garden on a plot of publicly owned land to help beautify the city. As part of “Operation Bloom,” participating businesses are allowed to post a small advertising sign in their garden. Sneakers decided to have fun with its sign at the bottom of the Winooski traffic circle. 

“Yield for Sneakers Bacon,” it read.

Not everyone got the joke. 

Last week, a Winooski woman who identified herself as a “vegan and member of a Muslim household,” posted a notice to Front Porch Forum, saying of the bacon sign: “Its insensitive and offensive to those who do not consume pork.” 

Citing Winooski’s demographic diversity — 31 languages are spoken in the local K-12 school — she requested that it come down.
...
Last Friday, Sneakers owner Marc Dysinger  announced that the bacon sign would come down, saying he didn’t want to offend anyone.

“We regret any harm or damage caused & the sign has been removed,” Dysinger wrote on the Front Porch Forum. “Our goal is to bring joy to Winooski as a community gathering place — never a source of stress or drama. We always appreciate any advice or input to help us achieve that goal. Thank you neighbors!”

Good on Sneakers--one of my favorite brunch sites ever--for making a community-oriented business decision.  But are you really fucking kidding me?  I have a hard time with this complaint, as though dietary choices are on the same plane as, dunno...racism or LGBT-phobia.  

Don't fucking eat God's most perfect food, I could give a roasted rat's ass.  Not sure how you can be offended by somebody else's sign advertising their culinary offerings.

ntodd

PS--This story only really caught my interest because in Southern VT off Route 100 we saw a sign for a smoked meats biz that said, "WHY NOT WRAP IT IN BACON?"  And really, why not?

August 25, 6:09 PM in And Fuck... | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Herding Puppies


Back from Dover, where we met Alaska.  Now Sam wants a puppy, 3 rabbits and 3 "baby chickens."  Because we don't have enough animals.

ntodd

PS--Photo credit: ergVT on her new iPhone.

August 25, 5:29 PM in Family Life | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

It's A Lot Like Blogging

Coming to That:

And while listening more closely now to
what he said,
I realized if no one paid him heed, it would
be as if he
hadn’t said it—if it came to that—and would
then not be
prevented from falling to forces known to
care little for
what he said, even if they heard it, their
being wily
and forceful enough to make sure it would
come to that.

Dorothea Tanning.

ntodd

August 25, 8:27 AM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, 08/24/2014

Put A Wiggle In Your Stride


Loosen up!

ntodd

August 24, 11:13 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Super Soviet!

Having seen Lenin in his mausoleum many, many times, not to mention all the statutes of Gagarin and war memorials and stars in the Kremlin wall and whatever, I just lovelovelove what Bulgarians are doing with legacy Soviet monuments.  

Because, really, fuck those guys.  We sucked total ass during the Cold War, but they were horrid to their own people and those in the Eastern Bloc, amongst others.  And their statutes should have pigeon shit and superhero motifs painted on them.

ntodd

PS--At some point I should digitize the slides I took in '86 and '90, but that would be a lot of work.

August 24, 9:13 PM | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Noooooooooo!

I'm heartbroken about the broken bottles of wine in the Napa Valley quake, too.  I know exactly how Holocaust survivors, Palestinians and black people in Ferguson feel, only worse.  Thankfully, I drink wine out of boxes, so it prolly won't oppress me too much, but I blame Obama for not stopping brown people from coming here and stealing all our fracking jobs.

ntodd

August 24, 8:26 PM | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

אָמֵן

Hope to see more of this:

Hundreds of Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors have signed a letter, published as an advertisement in Saturday's New York Times, condemning "the massacre of Palestinians in Gaza" and calling for a complete boycott of Israel.

According to the letter, the condemnation was prompted by anadvertisement written by Elie Wiesel and published in major news outlets worldwide, accusing Hamas of "child sacrifice" and comparing the group to the Nazis.

The letter, signed by 327 Jewish Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors and sponsored by the International Jewish Anti-Zionist Network, accuses Wiesel of "abuse of history" in order to justify Israel's actions in the Gaza Strip...The letter also blames the United States of aiding Israel in its Gaza operation, and the West in general of protecting Israel from condemnation.

"Genocide begins with the silence of the world," the letter reads.

The letter ends with a call to bring the blockade of Gaza to an immediate end, and for a full boycott of Israel. "Never again” must mean NEVER AGAIN FOR ANYONE!," the letter concludes.

The Shoah cannot be used to justify any more genocide, no matter what the magnitude.  It isn't a Get Out Of Humanity Free Card.

ntodd

August 24, 11:38 AM | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Burning Down The House


Watch out you might get what you're after.

ntodd

August 24, 10:13 AM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Burning Down The District

British bastards burned buildings in our nation's capital on this date, 1814.

James Monroe, then Secretary of State, reported:

In the morning of the 24th, I met the President at General Winder's quarters. Among other rumors of the enemy's movements, the General had just heard that he was marching towards Bladensburg. I asked if General Stansbury was apprised of it. He presumed that he was. I offered to join him.
The President and General Winder both expressed a wish that I would. I lost not a moment in complying with their desire. Between 11 and 12 I joined General Stansbury, who had moved his brigade on this side of the Eastern Branch, near the bridge.  I inquired where were the enemy? He replied, advancing, not more than three miles distant. I advised the General to form his troops to receive them, which he immediately commenced.
...
After General Stansbury had made [his troop] disposition, Mr. Walter Jones, junior, set out, at my request, for the city, to communicate it to the President, the Secretary of War, and General Winder, with the near approach of the enemy. Immediately after this General Winder arrived, and informed us that his whole force was in full march to Bladensburg. On taking a view of the order which had been formed, he approved of it. This was the more satisfactory, because it had then become impossible to make any essential change.
The General proceeded promptly, for the enemy were getting in sight, to make a disposition of such of his troops as had arrived...Near the road, leading from Bladensburg to Washington, we met the Secretary of War, and immediately afterwards, at the road, I met the President and Mr. Rush, who had just arrived, and who, joining with me, the Secretary of War, and General Winder, proceeded together towards the left of the Hue.
Mr. Rush informed me that the President intended, when every arrangement sliould be completed, to take a pistol with the members of the administration in the rear of the line, that, looking to all the functions of the Government, he might be able to act with their counsel according to circumstances. Shortly afterwards the President gave me the same intimation.
The action may be said to have commenced, when we had arrived in the rear of the battery near the bridge. The enemy had saluted us with their rockets, and, attempting to pass the bridge, our little batteries had begun to play on them.
After some pause, the President remarked to the Secretary of War and myself, that it would now be proper for us to retire in the rear, leaving the military movement to military men, which we did. The Attorney General followed us. After our little batteries were carried, and the left of our line broken, the President, with the members of the administration present, retired along the eminence on which the left of the line had been formed, viewing the progress of the action to the right.

Henry Adams' wrote in his History:

The Secretary of the Treasury, G. W. Campbell, on the morning of the battle went to the Cabinet meeting at the navy-yard, but his health, which had become much affected, obliged him to return to his lodgings instead of riding to Bladensburg. In parting from Madison, Campbell lent him a pair of pistols, which the President put in his holsters.
Federalists were curious to know whether the pistols were the same with which he shot Barent Gardenier, but learned only that they were fine duelling pistols, and that they were stolen from the President's holsters during his short stay at the White House after the battle. The secretary's duelling pistols became the best known of all the weapons unused that day ; but the secretary himself made no further appearance on the scene. He went to Frederick. The Secretary of the Navy and the Attorney-General accompanied the President, and shared his fortunes.
Although ridicule without end was showered on the President and the other civilians, their conduct was on the whole creditable to their courage and character; but of the commanding general no kind word could be said. Neither William Hull, Alexander Smyth, Dearborn, Wilkinson, nor Winchester showed such incapacity as Winder either to organize, fortify, fight, or escape. When he might have prepared defences, he acted as scout; when he might have fought, he still scouted ; when he retreated, he retreated in the wrong direction ; when he fought, he thought only of retreat; and whether scouting, re- treating, or fighting, he never betrayed an idea.

Paul Jennings, one of Madison's young slaves, recollected:

Well, on the 24th of August, sure enough, the British reached Bladensburg, and the fight began between 11 and 12. Even that very morning General Armstrong assured Mrs. Madison there was no danger. The President, with General Armstrong, General Winder, Colonel Monroe, Richard Rush, Mr. Graham, Tench Ringgold, and Mr. Duvall, rode out on horseback to Bladensburg to see how things looked. Mrs. Madison ordered dinner to be ready at 3, as usual; I set the table myself, and brought up the ale, cider, and wine, and placed them in the coolers, as all the Cabinet and several military gentlemen and strangers were expected.

While waiting, at just about 3, as Sukey, the house-servant, was lolling out of a chamber window, James Smith, a free colored man who had accompanied Mr. Madison to Bladensburg, gallopped up to the house, waving his hat, and cried out, "Clear out, clear out! General Armstrong has ordered a retreat!"

All then was confusion. Mrs. Madison ordered her carriage, and passing through the dining-room, caught up what silver she could crowd into her old-fashioned reticule, and then jumped into the chariot with her servant girl Sukey, and Daniel Carroll, who took charge of them; Jo. Bolin drove them over to Georgetown Heights; the British were expected in a few minutes. Mr. Cutts, her brother-in-law, sent me to a stable on 14th street, for his carriage. People were running in every direction. John Freeman (the colored butler) drove off in the coachee with his wife, child, and servant; also a feather bed lashed on behind the coachee, which was all the furniture saved, except part of the silver and the portrait of Washington (of which I will tell you by-and-by).

I will here mention that although the British were expected every minute, they did not arrive for some hours; in the mean time, a rabble, taking advantage of the confusion, ran all over the White House, and stole lots of silver and whatever they could lay their hands on.

About sundown I walked over to the Georgetown ferry, and found the President and all hands (the gentlemen named before, who acted as a sort of body-guard for him) waiting for the boat. It soon returned, and we all crossed over, and passed up the road about a mile; they then left us servants to wander about. In a short time several wagons from Bladensburg, drawn by Barney's artillery horses, passed up the road, having crossed the Long Bridge before it was set on fire. As we were cutting up some pranks a white wagoner ordered us away, and told his boy Tommy to reach out his gun, and he would shoot us. I told him "he had better have used it at Bladensburg." Just then we came up with Mr. Madison and his friends, who had been wandering about for some hours, consulting what to do. I walked on to a Methodist minister's, and in the evening, while he was at prayer, I heard a tremendous explosion, and, rushing out, saw that the public buildings, navy yard, ropewalks, &c., were on fire.

...
It has often been stated in print, that when Mrs. Madison escaped from the White House, she cut out from the frame the large portrait of Washington (now in one of the parlors there), and carried it off. This is totally false. She had no time for doing it. It would have required a ladder to get it down. All she carried off was the silver in her reticule, as the British were thought to be but a few squares off, and were expected every moment. John Susé (a Frenchman, then door-keeper, and still living) and Magraw, the President's gardener, took it down and sent it off on a wagon, with some large silver urns and such other valuables as could be hastily got hold of. When the British did arrive, they ate up the very dinner, and drank the wines, &c., that I had prepared for the President's party.

Rear Admiral Cockburn informed Vice Admiral Cochrane:

The Contest being Completely ended and the Enemy having retired from the Field, the General gave the Army about two hours rest, when he again moved forward on Washington; It was however dark before we reached that City, and on the General, myself and some officers advancing a short way past the first Houses of the Town without being accompanied by the Troops, the Enemy opened upon us a heavy fire of Musquetry from the Capitol [which housed the Library of Congress at the time] and two other houses, these were therefore almost immediately Stormed by our People, taken possession of, and set on fire, after which the Town submitted without further resistance.

The Enemy himself on our entering the Town set Fire to the Navy Yard, (filled with Naval Stores) a Frigate of the largest class almost ready for Launching, and a Sloop of War laying off it, as he also did to the Fort which protected the Sea approach to Washington.

On taking Possession of the City we also set fire to the Presidents Palace, the Treasury, and the War Office, and in the morning Captain Wainwright went with a Party to see that the Destruction in the Navy Yard was Complete, when he destroyed whatever Stores and Buildings had escaped the Flames of the preceeding Night-- A large quantity of Ammunition and ordnance Stores were likewise destroyed by us in the Arsenal, as were about Two hundred pieces of Artillery of different Calibres, as well as a Vast quantity of small Arms. Two Rope Walks of a very extensive Nature, full of Tar, Rope &c. Situated at a considerable distance from the Yard were likewise set Fire to and consumed, in short Sir I do not believe a Vestage of Public Property, or a Store of any kind which could be converted to the use of the Government, escaped Destruction; the Bridges across the Eastern Branch and the Potowmac were likewise destroyed.

So much for that vaunted militia defending hearth and home.  Yet somehow we managed to win in the end and...re-establish the status quo ante.  Well done, us.  Well, I guess it meant the Revolution and Republic were finally solidified, so that's something.

ntodd

PS--Yeah, a repost from the 199th anniversary.  Ask the House for authority to sue me.

August 24, 8:09 AM | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, 08/23/2014

Don't Talk To Strangers


How come I never knew Rick Springfield is Australian?  And a bit creepy?

ntodd

August 23, 11:27 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Perry's Dog Won't Hunt

Well, duh:

He has no proof that ISIS is crossing the Southern border, and for his purposes Perry doesn’t need any. This is all about creating a distraction away from his felony indictment, and giving himself another issue to run on 2016. Rick Perry is styling himself to be the great terrorist fighter from Texas, but terrorists are coming across the border, it also means that he has done a lousy job of keeping his state safe.

The Pentagon wasn’t about let Gov. Perry spread baseless fear. There is no evidence that ISIS (ISIL) has entered the United States over the Southern border. Perry invented a terrorist invasion in order to combine the terrorism and immigration issues. Gov. Perry is trying to create a distraction because he doesn’t want the media looking too hard at his behavior in Texas. It doesn’t take much digging to uncover Perry’s real motives behind his illegal attempt to force the Travis County DA to resign.

Since H Brooke Paige has given up his birther lawsuit, I need something else to entertain me.  I think I've found it.

ntodd

August 23, 11:08 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

KFC On Mars

Sometimes we see what we want to see on other worlds.  Sometimes it's actually there, though maybe after some mistakes.  But I'm sure there's no thigh bone--of a chicken or little green man--on Mars.

ntodd

August 23, 10:48 PM in Mars, Bitches! | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Justice Tagging


In BTV this evening.

ntodd

August 23, 9:56 PM in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Fight The Real Enemy

Police violence is as American as apple pie, but we don't know much about it really.

ntodd

August 23, 9:48 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Burning Man

RMJ and other folks in TX know more than national press and bloggers, so you should listen:

[Y]ou'll find a lot of Texas journalists agreeing with my assessment:  Perry is crooked, and it may have finally caught up with him.  Maybe it's Al Capone going to jail for tax evasion, but you take the charges you can prove in court...Rick Perry was indicted after a complaint was brought which a judge decided merited investigation, and so appointed a special prosecutor, who investigated and then convened a grand jury.  Down here, we call that "due process."

Again, no guarantee of conviction, but this isn't some half-assed political stunt.  There's smoke, and very likely fire.

ntodd

August 23, 3:11 PM | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Got A Live One Here


No, not that bat dance.

ntodd

August 23, 12:13 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Agitation

Anthony on some of those outside agitators:

A rule of thumb about these kinds of groups that come in and try to hijack high profile local protests is that any of them that advocate or encourage violence are not in it for the benefit of the people who live there.  Those people will leave, the people who live there will be the ones who have to live with the aftermath of their exciting and titillating violence.  This is especially true when there is some intellectual program thought up in some other place, like San Francisco or by a bunch of white intellectuals who never have to live with the results of the violence they call for, when that violence has to stop, as it always does, the Revolution it was supposed to incite delayed for future opportunities. 

Especially stupid are the anarchists who would have all civil authority end, leaving communities to be governed by those who always rise up whenever the police leave, gangsters and gangsters who war with each other as they terrorize, rob and exploit the people who have no choice but to live there.  And I will repeat that, we know what would happen under anarchism because it happens in any section of a city or country where there is a vacuum of civil authority and police presence, the gangs take over.   The problem in Ferguson was that the police were a white occupation army in a black community, the answer to that is to have an effective police force which is part of the community.

Media types rely too much on the 'outside agitators' trope, but that's not to say there aren't opportunistic groups and individuals who are like revolutionary moths to the flame of unrest.  It's a pretty clear line the difference between supporting people in their struggle for justice and making it all about you and your precious agenda.

ntodd

August 23, 10:51 AM in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Into The Lens

Yup:

[P]utting aside the fact that footage from a dashboard or chest-worn camera may not have negated what we're seeing in Ferguson—where racial tension has been brewing for years, the result of a variety of factors—deploying such cameras isn't necessarily the straightforward fix some observers make it out to be.

"Independent research on body-worn camera technology is urgently needed," wrote Michael White, a professor at Arizona State University and the author of a Justice Department-commissioned report on body-worn technology studies published earlier this year. "Most of the claims made by advocates and critics of the technology remain untested."

"I think body cameras are definitely a net good," says David Harris, a law professor and police behavior expert at the University of Pittsburgh. "They are one of the most prominent technologies to come along in a long time in terms of accountability, evidence gathering, [and] in terms of, frankly, changing behavior on either side of the camera. Nothing is a silver bullet, but this has the potential to be a substantial advance."

Harris, who consults for law enforcement agencies on the side, points to a study by police in Rialto, California. After introducing body-worn video cameras in February 2012, that department reported an 88 percent reduction over the previous year in complaints against officers—and the use of force by its officers fell by nearly 60 percent. A separate British study of one small police department looked at data collected in 2005 and 2006 and found a 14 percent drop in citizen complaints in the six months after cameras were introduced compared to same six-month period of the previous year.

White's paper concludes, however, that the data on why such drops occur is far from conclusive. In addition, police forces looking to adopt the technology must wade through a maze of legal, ethical, and resource issues before deploying it widely. For instance, a dozen states require two-party consent for recording oral communications. In those places, police would likely need a legislative exemption or other workaround to use the devices.

I'm not sure anybody's suggesting cop cams are a panacea, but they are clearly one tool to mitigate police abuse of authority.  And in a society where we've come to expect general surveillance of our everyday lives--not so many cameras as in the UK, perhaps, but still lots of places--why should the watchmen not be watched when they interact with their community?

ntodd

August 23, 10:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

"On my lips a song with a divine resonance."

Revolt Against The Sun:

She stood before the sun, screaming:
'Sun! You are like my rebellious heart
Whose youth swept life away
And whose ever-renewed light
Gave the stars to drink.
Careful! Do not let a bewildered sadness
Or a sighing tear in my eyes deceive you.
For sadness is the form of my revolt and my resistance
Beneath the night—divinity be my witness!'

Nazik Al-Malaika.

ntodd

August 23, 9:24 AM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Well, That Puts A Damper On Things

King George III, August 23, 1775:

Whereas many of our subjects in divers parts of our Colonies and Plantations in North America, misled by dangerous and ill designing men, and forgetting the allegiance which they owe to the power that has protected and supported them...have at length proceeded to open and avowed rebellion, by arraying themselves in a hostile manner, to withstand the execution of the law, and traitorously preparing, ordering and levying war against us:

And whereas, there is reason to apprehend that such rebellion hath been much promoted and encouraged by the traitorous correspondence, counsels and comfort of divers wicked and desperate persons within this realm:

[W]e do accordingly strictly charge and command all...our obedient and loyal subjects, to...transmit...due and full information of all persons who shall be found carrying on correspondence with, or in any manner or degree aiding or abetting the persons now in open arms and rebellion against our Government, within any of our Colonies and Plantations in North America, in order to bring to condign punishment the authors, perpetrators, and abetters of such traitorous designs.

It was all downhill from there.

ntodd

August 23, 8:08 AM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, 08/22/2014

Catching Woozles


Or nearly so, as read by Milne himself.

ntodd

August 22, 10:49 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday Sadieblogging


From yesterday.


The bleachers.

ntodd

August 22, 10:15 PM in Family Life | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Why Haven't The Cubs Won The World Series Since 1908?

Naturally, because of Obamacare.

ntodd

August 22, 9:59 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Knives Vs Guns

Take a moment to look at the police barriers at this peace march I attended in '05.  They're spaced a certain way for a reason: because they need to slow down potential threats just long enough for cops to unholster their weapons and fire.

The killing of unarmed black kids, and black people in general, is a clear and horrible pattern that's part and parcel with out country's structural racism.  Yet I understand why police might gun down a knife-wielding person because shit happens fast.

That is all.

ntodd

August 22, 9:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Solid Gould


Because Loomis, historical terms of endearment, Henry V's fine cock, comes this.  Just follow along.

ntodd 

August 22, 8:46 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Constitutional Authority, Schmonstitutional Authority

Not sure if it counts as ironic, but the House bill passed in June to give Boner authority to sue Obama over his lack of authority to exercise executive authority still doesn't have a Constitutional Authority Statement as mandated by House rules.  Maybe because there's no provision in the Constitution to violate separation of powers?

ntodd

August 22, 8:07 PM in Constitution, Schmonstitution | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Extraconstitutional, Drunk And Racist Is No Way To Go Through Life, Son

There's nothing better than law enforcement officers giving racist speeches to traitorous militia folks.

ntodd

August 22, 7:18 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

I Can Make Tenuous Historial Connections, Too!

The common thread between the Haitian Slave Rebellion and Obamacare is pretty amazing.  And strong.

ntodd

August 22, 6:58 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

A Felon Says What?

Bless his heart:

“The common thread between ISIS and what’s going in Ferguson is you have these people who basically believe that to correct a perceived injustice, it’s perfectly okay to inflict all types of new injustices,” D’Souza said on NewsMaxTV’s Steve Malzberg Show. “Behead guys who had nothing to do with it. Go and loot shops from business owners who were not part of the original problem whatsoever. And all of this is then licensed by the left and licensed to some degree by the media.”

How lazy of the convicted criminal.  Didn't go all the way back to Stalin, Nat Turner, and Cain.

ntodd

August 22, 6:18 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

What Kind Of Country Are We?

Pierce:

The body they left in the street. For four hours. Ferguson, Missouri was a place where they left a body in the street. For four hours. And the rage rose, and the backlash built, and the cameras arrived, and so did the cops, and the thing became something beyond what it was in the first place. And, in a very real way, in the streets of Ferguson, the body was still in the street. What kind of place leaves the body of a boy in the street? What kind of country does that?

But Michael Brown and the protesters are the problem.

ntodd

August 22, 4:32 PM in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Resumé

The classic:

Razors pain you;
Rivers are damp;
Acids stain you;
And drugs cause cramp.
Guns aren’t lawful;
Nooses give;
Gas smells awful;
You might as well live.

Happy birthday, Dorothy.

ntodd

August 22, 12:55 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

"It's a hell of a thing, killing a man."


We all got it coming, kid.

ntodd

August 22, 9:48 AM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Judgers Gonna Judge Redux

I guess every once in a while we need to be reminded, there are stuck up sticky beak assholes on the Internet who feel compelled to police parents' photos.  They can fuck right the hell off.

ntodd

August 22, 8:10 AM in And Fuck..., Family Life | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, 08/21/2014

One O'Clock Jump


Happy 110th, Count!

ntodd

August 21, 10:22 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

"O fly away home, fly away."

Black Gentleman:

                                                         What an eye can’t imagine
it can’t find: not in blood, swollen in the stiff knees
of a cypress, not definitely in some dreaming man’s dream — 
    Let’s have his nature speak.
What will the incredible night of  him say here, to his thousand
moons, now that he can rise up to any tree, rope or none, but not fear it?

Rickey Laurentiis.

ntodd

August 21, 9:44 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

I Pushed My Soul In A Deep Dark Hole


And then I followed it in.

ntodd

August 21, 9:03 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Localized Tyranny

Digby:

Devolving to the local governments will hardly make things better. It's likely to make it much worse for a whole lot of people. Think Salem and witches. 

Think Kelo.  Think Little Rock.  Think Madison.  

Oh, and Ferguson.

ntodd

August 21, 7:51 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Don't Fence Me In


I had to dig this up yesterday for a Facebook thread.

ntodd

August 21, 7:26 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Trolling Scalia

This is probably my favorite thing in the whole wide world right now:

The difficulty for the defendants is that the Supreme Court has made clear that moral disapproval, standing alone, cannot sustain a provision of this kind. Windsor so indicates. Further, in Bowers v. Hardwick, 478 U.S. 186 (1986), the Court upheld a state law prohibiting sodomy, basing the decision on the state’s prerogative to make moral choices of this kind. But later, in Lawrence v. Texas, 539 U.S. 558 (2003), the Court revisited the issue, struck down a statute prohibiting gay sex, and expressly overruled Bowers. In his Lawrence dissent, Justice Scalia made precisely the point set out above—that a ban on same-sex marriage must stand or fall on the proposition that the state can enforce moral disapproval of the practice without violating the Fourteenth Amendment. Justice Scalia put it this way: “State laws against . . . same-sex marriage . . . are likewise sustainable only in light of Bowers’ validation of laws based on moral choices.” Lawrence, 539 U.S. at 590 (Scalia, J., dissenting).

I should create a new blog category just for this sort of entertainment.

ntodd

PS--More from The Atlantic.

August 21, 6:59 PM in Constitution, Schmonstitution | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Anybody Got A Copy Of The Constitution In Ferguson?

What First?  Fourth?  Fifth?  Eighth?  Fourteenth?  At least the cops have the right to kill if they get scared of a black person, while no black person who feels threatened by a white cop can stand their ground...

ntodd

August 21, 6:39 PM in Constitution, Schmonstitution | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Quakers Can Be So Fucking Annoying

Via Loomis, this is cool:

It made sense for the Quakers to cultivate an exaggerated presence in order to make their voices heard among the clamor of other religious sects formed after English Civil War. But what set them apart was the volume of their printed works. During the early years of their establishment in the 1650s, Quakers published about a pamphlet a week, paid for through a collectively managed fund, and distributed by a network of itinerant preachers known as the “Valiant Sixty.” The Sixty, which were in fact more than sixty people, included George Fox, Margaret Fell Fox, Mary Fisher, and sixteen-year-old George Whitehead. Because they commanded others to tremble before the Lord, they were called Quakers, a title they re-appropriated from their critics. Among themselves, they were the Society of Friends. Unlike nearly every other group to arise out of the traumatic events of 1640s England, the Friends have survived as a religious group to this day.

Blogging is clearly an old Friends' tradition...

ntodd

August 21, 5:06 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday Nannyblogging


They fight over sharing, but out in the field, they can make up easily.

ntodd

August 21, 3:26 PM in Family Life | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)